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dc.contributor.authorSnider, Keith F.
dc.contributor.authorKidalov, Max V.
dc.contributor.authorRendon, Rene G.
dc.dateFall 2013
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-04T22:28:56Z
dc.date.available2015-05-04T22:28:56Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationPublic Administration Quarterly, Fall 2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45133
dc.description.abstractPublic procurement serves as the means by which public goods and services are acquired through contracts with private firms, as well as a means by which governments promote policies such as socioeconomic diversity. In the U.S., diversity goals are pursued through preferences for contract awards by public agencies to businesses owned by members of disadvantaged groups, such as Native Americans, women, and disabled veterans. In this paper we argue that the extent to which these policies are realized depends substantially on implementation--specifically, on agency contracting capacity. Given current deficiencies in federal agency contracting capacity, diversity governance is largely missing. Rather, agencies use minority-based preferences in order to reduce their workload, thereby awarding contracts for convenience rather than to redress disadvantage and discrimination. We demonstrate that, when agencies use these expedient measures to sidestep the intent of public policy, they risk diverting contracts from deserving to undeserving firms. Unless agencies increase their contacting capacity, diversity governance in this important area of public administration will remain impoverished.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDiversity Governance by Convenience? Federal Contracting for Minority-Owned Small Businessesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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