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dc.contributor.advisorMalley, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorMatei, Florina Cristiana
dc.contributor.authorAskari
dc.dateMarch 2015
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-06T19:17:18Z
dc.date.available2015-05-06T19:17:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45157
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe South China Sea is one of the maritime hot spots in the world and perhaps accounts for more clashes than other disputed waters, due to the abundancy of the natural resources that can fulfill the region’s rising demand of energy and food. Six countries currently claim some or the whole part of the South China Sea: Brunei, China, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Vietnam, all with overlapping claims. Although the South China Sea claimant countries have clashes with each other, the close proximity of the Philippines and Vietnam to China has contributed the greatest number of clashes. The modernization of naval forces in the region, combined with the increasing frequency and seriousness of these clashes, suggests that they may escalate to the level of military conflict. However, in almost every case, the vessels involved are civilian, not military. Without coordination and control between those agencies and naval forces from each country, there is a risk that those incidents could still escalate into military conflict. This condition highlights the importance of Civil-Military Relations; in particular, effective coordination between civil and military agencies within each country, and between the civilian and military agencies of each party in the dispute.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/preventingescala1094545157
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titlePreventing escalation in the South China Sea disputed waters: a comparative study of Republic of the Philippines and socialist Republic of Vietnamen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorCivil-Military Relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorcivilian and military maritime cooperationen_US
dc.subject.authorthe South China Sea disputesen_US
dc.subject.authormaritime conflict preventionen_US
dc.subject.authorthe Philippine Navy and the Philippine Coast Guarden_US
dc.subject.authorthe Vietnam People’s Navy and the Vietnam Coast Guarden_US
dc.subject.authorthe People’s Liberation Army Navyen_US
dc.subject.authormaritime law enforcementen_US
dc.description.serviceCommander, Indonesian Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Civil-Military Relations)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Civil-Military Relations)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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