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dc.contributor.advisorMalley, Michael
dc.contributor.authorAvila, Michelle B.
dc.dateMarch 2015
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-06T19:17:18Z
dc.date.available2015-05-06T19:17:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45158
dc.description.abstractIn the 1970s, Malaysia’s government promoted economic growth through an economic structural change from agriculture to industry. During the economic changeover, Malaysia’s lack of human capital contributed to the persistent labor shortages. To meet the demand for labor, especially in manufacturing and construction, the government adopted a liberal immigration policy that permitted large numbers of workers to enter the country. Although many entered legally, many more did not. Most workers entered from Indonesia, which was close in proximity and shared a common culture. By the 1990s, many Malaysians increasingly began to blame to immigrants for societal woes and economic setbacks. The government found itself in a quandary. Its immigration policy was promoting economic growth, but also generating opposition from society. Public opinion about both effects of immigration policy—economic growth and public opposition—could determine political outcomes. In response to public pressure, the government adopted a more restrictive immigration policy. During the 2000s, the Malaysian government deported tens of thousands of illegal immigrants annually. The government’s crackdown on illegal immigrants specifically targeted Indonesians. The government’s economic policies, however, still favored sectors that depended heavily on immigrant workers. This thesis analyzes two periods of time—1970–1990 and 1990–2010—to determine whether labor demand, government approval, or public pressure influenced the drastic change in Malaysia’s immigration policy.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theevolutionofma1094545158
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe evolution of Malaysia’s immigration policy since 1970en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMabry, Tristan
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorMalaysiaen_US
dc.subject.authorimmigrationen_US
dc.subject.authorIndonesiaen_US
dc.subject.authorillegal immigrationen_US
dc.subject.authormigrationen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Affairs (South East Asia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Affairs (South East Asia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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