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dc.contributor.advisorLindsey, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorKun, Boris
dc.contributor.authorWhaley, Will
dc.dateMarch 2015
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-06T19:17:46Z
dc.date.available2015-05-06T19:17:46Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45212
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis replicates recent diagnostic utility studies to determine whether the original methods are (1) generalizable to a new population and (2) useful in identifying specific questioning strategies relevant to international militaries. Previous research shows that people are, on average, only slightly better-than-chance at detecting deception. In 2006, Personality and Social Psychology Review published Accuracy of Deception Judgments in which Charles F. Bond Jr. and Bella DePaulo identified that meta-analysis yields an across-study average accuracy rate of about 54%. New research has shifted from the historical cue-based deception detection paradigm in favor of the idea of diagnostic utility. Specifically, this new line of research provides a basis for demonstrating that the design of specific questions is vital in determining deceptive individuals. Currently, the research conducted thus far provides levels of deception detection accuracy significantly greater than the usual slightly-better-than-chance results that is characterized by historical research. Our findings from quantitative Study 1 demonstrated that international military officer participants detected deception at 70.8% for experts and 63.8% for non-experts. Finally, the authors’ qualitative Study 2 identified that participant’s claim to have utilized third-party information, physical information, and verbal/nonverbal clues most often when detecting deception in previous situations. These findings are in line with historical research.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/deceptiondetecti1094545212
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDeception detection process and accuracy: an examination of how international military officers detect deception in the workplaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderRoberts, Benjamin
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorDeception Detectionen_US
dc.subject.authorFrauden_US
dc.subject.authorDiagnostic Utilityen_US
dc.subject.authorQuestioning Methoden_US
dc.subject.authorInternational Officersen_US
dc.subject.authorOfficersen_US
dc.subject.authorWorkplace Deceptionen_US
dc.subject.authorFraudulent Enlistmenten_US
dc.subject.authorRecruitingen_US
dc.subject.authorTrainingen_US
dc.subject.authorExecutive Developmenten_US
dc.subject.authorCost Reduction Solutionsen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceEnsign, United States Navyen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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