U.S. strategic interests and Georgia’s prospects for NATO membership

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Authors
Martel, Albert M.
Subjects
Georgia
Tbilisi
Abkhazia
South Ossetia
NATO
NATO enlargement
Partnership for Peace
PfP
International Partnership Action plan
IPAP
Annual National Program
ANP
planning and Review Process
PARP
Membership Action plan
MAP
NATO-Georgia Commission
NGC
NATO-Russia Council
2008 Russia-Georgia Conflict
Rose Revolution
Mikheil Saakashvili
Bidzina Ivanishvili
Giorgi Margvelashvili
Georgian Dream
United National Movement
UNM
Eurasian Transport Corridor
Northern Distribution Network
U.S.-Georgia Charter on Strategic Partnership
Millennium Challenge Account
Freedom Consolidation Act
Georgia Train and Equip Program
GTEP
Sustainment and Stability Operations Program
SSOP
Georgia Deployment Program-ISAF
Georgian Armed Forces
GAF
Advisors
Yost, David S.
Date of Issue
2015-03
Date
March 2015
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Many observers in NATO and European Union (EU) countries hold that Russia is attempting to challenge the increasing Western influence in Central and Eastern Europe and reassert itself as a regional and global superpower. The 2008 Russia-Georgia conflict and the ongoing crisis in Ukraine provide evidence in support of this theory. Twelve Central and Eastern European nations have nonetheless joined NATO since 1999, and others have pledged their membership aspirations. This fact alone suggests that a general fear of Russian aggression persists among Central and Eastern European nations, and that NATO enlargement is both justified and welcomed. This thesis examines Georgia’s prospects for NATO membership and assesses U.S. strategic interests in this regard. To accomplish this, this thesis analyzes Georgia’s geostrategic importance and investigates links between Georgian and U.S. foreign policies as they relate to NATO enlargement. As regards Georgia, the key questions concern the extent to which the United States supports Tbilisi’s candidacy for Alliance membership, and whether the United States and its NATO Allies are willing to accept the risks and responsibilities that would be incurred with Georgia’s NATO membership. This thesis concludes that U.S. decisions regarding Georgia’s candidacy for NATO membership will be of critical importance.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs
National Security Affairs
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
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This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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