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dc.contributor.advisorBellavita, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorDragani, Nancy J.
dc.dateJun-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T23:05:31Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T23:05:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45841
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractFor decades emergency managers have strived to educate the American public on how to prepare for disasters. Yet many Americans are still not prepared, at least as preparedness is defined by our nation’s emergency management community. If the standard approach that the emergency management community has used for the last several decades is flawed, then the needle might not simply be stuck. It may, along with the entire system, be broken. Perhaps the problem is not just with the needle, which is simply measuring ac-tion or inaction, but with the actions themselves and the messages used to promote them. This thesis explores whether the actions individuals are asked to take are reasonable based on identified risk, and practical and sustainable based on barriers such as income and life-style. In addition, are the crafters of the message cognizant of the importance of sense-making on how an individual may choose to act based on the way he or she senses and responds to an incident, as well as the personal perception of self? Recent Federal Emer-gency Management Agency preparedness surveys and public education campaigns ad-dress the need for long-term resiliency over simple actions but may not go far enough to affect lasting change in behavior.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titlePersonal preparedness in America: the needle is brokenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWoodbury, Glen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorbarriersen_US
dc.subject.authorcommunityen_US
dc.subject.authorCynefinen_US
dc.subject.authorCynefin frameworken_US
dc.subject.authordisasteren_US
dc.subject.authorindividualen_US
dc.subject.authorpersonalen_US
dc.subject.authorpreparednessen_US
dc.subject.authorreadinessen_US
dc.subject.authorreadyen_US
dc.subject.authorrecoveryen_US
dc.subject.authorresilienceen_US
dc.subject.authorrisken_US
dc.description.serviceFormer Executive Director of the Ohio Emergency Management Agencyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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