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dc.contributor.advisorBuettner, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorMcLearen, Luke J.
dc.dateJun-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T23:05:53Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T23:05:53Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45903
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractAs the Marine Corps continues to conduct small-unit distributed operations, the strain on its logistics intensifies. The Marine Corps must search for a solution to increase the efficiency and responsiveness of its logistics. One solution is using additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing. This thesis answers the question of how additive manufacturing can improve the effectiveness of Marine Corps logistics. In order to answer the question, beneficial process(es), application(s), and level of integration are determined through a comparative analysis of current and future 3D-printing processes, examination of several civilian and military examples, and examination of the impact across current doctrine, organization, training, material, leadership, personnel, and facilities. Several issues should be addressed prior to the Marine Corps fully integrating 3D printers, such as the lack of certification and qualification standards, unreliable end product results, and determining ownership of intellectual property. When these issues are properly mitigated, the Marine Corps should procure printers for the purpose of manufacturing repair parts, tools, and other support aids. Marine Expeditionary Units should be the first units to receive the printers. If the printers are integrated properly, they could assist logisticians in supporting Marines conducting distributed operations throughout the battlefield.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/additivemanufact1094545903
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAdditive manufacturing in the Marine Corpsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderScott, Gerald
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences (IS)
dc.subject.authoradditive manufacturingen_US
dc.subject.author3D printingen_US
dc.subject.authorimproving logisticsen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Warfare Systems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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