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dc.contributor.advisorDew, Nicholas
dc.contributor.advisorRegnier, Eva
dc.contributor.authorPriester, Pete
dc.contributor.authorGrusich, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorTortora, Paul
dc.dateJun-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T23:05:59Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T23:05:59Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45925
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project is to examine the feasibility and cost effectiveness of liquid air energy storage and microgrid options to meet power demand aboard Naval Station Pearl Harbor. This infrastructure serves multiple Navy objectives, including providing standalone power support to endure emergency situations, providing pierside power for Navy vessels, enhancing the Navy’s cost savings from the proposed utility scale West Loch solar PV project, and helping to meet the Navy’s and Hawaii’s renewable energy goals in accordance with Department of Defense mandates and Navy-stated objectives for energy self-sufficiency and the goals of the Hawaiian Clean Energy Initiative. The results indicate that, in grid-tied operation, a solar PV alone is the option with the highest financial net present value. Microturbines are the least-cost option to assure backup power in the event of a grid outage. The microgrid model in this study does not account for the possibility of using demand management to minimize power bills. Storage coupled with the proper control equipment and algorithms for demand management could improve its NPV by accounting for savings from arbitrage. This analysis will assist the Commander Navy Region Hawaii to determine specific actions to provide energy resiliency and self-sufficiency at Pearl Harbor.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleRenewable energy and storage implementation in Naval Station Pearl Harboren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authormicrogriden_US
dc.subject.authormicroturbineen_US
dc.subject.authorrenewable energyen_US
dc.subject.authorphotovoltaic generationen_US
dc.subject.authorelectrical storageen_US
dc.subject.authorenergy storageen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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