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dc.contributor.advisorGregg, Heather S.
dc.contributor.authorRevell, Brian
dc.contributor.authorNemeth, Ryan-Ross
dc.dateJun-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T23:06:01Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T23:06:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45929
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States has spent the last 14 years engaging in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan that have aimed, in part, to rebuild two dysfunctional states. However, after billions of dollars in development money, thousands of soldiers’ lives lost, and over a decade of time, neither of these countries has achieved the desired degree of stability; both states remain fragile and sources of regional and global insecurity. This thesis investigates the role that corruption has played in undermining efforts to stabilize Iraq and Afghanistan by conducting a longitudinal study that begins with the earliest days of state formation, and concludes with U.S.-led stabilization efforts post-September 11th. This thesis finds that, of the four types of corruption studied (crisis, nepotism, market, and patronage), market corruption is stabilizing in the near-term but becomes destabilizing over time; patronage and nepotism can be stabilizing in the short- and medium-terms, but ultimately create the potential for long-term destabilization; and crisis corruption is the most destabilizing form of corruption and rarely produces stability. These findings provide the U.S. government and U.S. military with an evaluative tool for considering different forms of corruption and their effects on stabilization operations in the modern world.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe road not taken: addressing corruption during stability operationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderLober, George
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorcorruptionen_US
dc.subject.authorstabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorinstabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorcrisis corruptionen_US
dc.subject.authormarket corruptionen_US
dc.subject.authorpatronageen_US
dc.subject.authornepotismen_US
dc.subject.authorIraqen_US
dc.subject.authorAfghanistanen_US
dc.subject.authorstability operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorreconstructionen_US
dc.subject.authorstate buildingen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
dc.description.serviceMaster Sergeant, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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