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dc.contributor.advisorChandrasekhara, Muguru S.
dc.contributor.advisorSathe, Sanjeev B.
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Corwin J.
dc.dateJun-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-05T23:06:08Z
dc.date.available2015-08-05T23:06:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/45956
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractWind loads on sun tracking solar reflector panels exposed to the atmospheric boundary layer were established through surface static pressure measurements to determine how wind affects them, specifically at the request of SPAWAR-Pacific, which has developed a custom design. A 1:8 scale model of a four-panel array was studied in the Naval Postgraduate School wind tunnel. Wind velocity, wind angle orientation, and individual panel positions, at which the highest pressure coefficient cases were anticipated, were varied. The pressure coefficients were measured by an array of Scanivalve pressure transducers with 16 pressure taps drilled into the top and bottom surfaces of each panel. Oil flow and smoke flow visualization techniques were performed to better understand the flow features that led to the greatest pressure coefficients. A parapet was included to observe the wind effects of various positions. Additionally, pressure measurements were observed using a rounded edge installed on the lead panel edges. This notion was to assist in not only minimizing wind loads, but also in determining a safe stow position of the array during high wind events. The measurements and the flow visualization studies both provided a cohesive and constructive picture of the flow. The windward panel was found to be subjected to the thrust of the wind loads in most cases, with a maximum recorded differential pressure coefficient of 3.25. However, when in combination with attaching the rounded edge to the windward panel and setting it negative five degrees, pressure coefficients were decreased by more than 70%. Parapets of the appropriate help also reduced the measured loads significantly.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWind effects on sun tracking solar reflecting panelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authorWind loadsen_US
dc.subject.authorwind effectsen_US
dc.subject.authorPV arrayen_US
dc.subject.authorsolar reflector panels.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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