Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGarfinkel, Simson L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-14T23:04:31Z
dc.date.available2015-08-14T23:04:31Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Scientist, Volume 101, September - October 2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46063
dc.descriptionA reprint from American Scientist the magazine of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Societyen_US
dc.description.abstractSince the 1980s, computers have had increasing roles in all aspects of human life—including an involvement in criminal acts. This development has led to the rise of digital forensics, the uncovering and examination of evidence located on all things electronic with digital storage, including computers, cell phones, and networks. Digital forensics researchers and practitioners stand at the forefront of some of the most challenging problems in computer science, including “big data” analysis, natural language processing, data visualizations, and cybersecurity.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDigital Forensicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record