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dc.contributor.authorChaudhary, Latika
dc.contributor.authorRubin, Jared
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T00:29:15Z
dc.date.available2015-08-19T00:29:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46090
dc.description.abstractIdentifying the effect of a ruler’s religious identity on policy is challenging because religious identity rarely varies over time and place. We address this problem by exploiting quasi-random variation in the religion of rulers in the Indian Princely States. Using data from the 1911 census, we find that Muslim-ruled states had lower Hindu literacy but the religion of the ruler had no statistically significant impact on Muslim literacy, railroad ownership, or post office provision. These results support the hypothesis that rulers provide less public goods when religious institutions provide a substitute targeted at their co-religionists.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleReligious Identity and the Provision of Public Goods: Evidence from the Indian Princely Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorPublic Goodsen_US
dc.subject.authorIdentityen_US
dc.subject.authorReligionen_US
dc.subject.authorLiteracyen_US
dc.subject.authorRailroadsen_US
dc.subject.authorPost Officesen_US
dc.subject.authorPrincely Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorIndiaen_US
dc.subject.authorIslamen_US
dc.subject.authorHinduismen_US


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