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dc.contributor.authorHenderson, David R.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T22:43:55Z
dc.date.available2015-08-19T22:43:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.citationEcon Journal Watch, Vol. 10, No. 2, May 2013, pp. 189-194
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46118
dc.description.abstractIt is not impossible for there to be another economist of Milton Friedman’s stature, but it is unlikely. Milton had a rare combination of characteristics. His brilliance showed up in his economics work early in his life and led him to some major contributions that affected the profession’s views on Keynesian economics, the causes of the Great Depression, and inflation. But if that had been ‘all’ he had done, we would not be having this symposium. He also was a passionate, warm man of great integrity. His fight against the military draft, his public appearances on television, and his willingness to give advice to young people all demonstrate those characteristics.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWhy Milton Friedman Was Rareen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)


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