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dc.contributor.authorQin, Xin
dc.contributor.authorDirenzo, Marco S.
dc.contributor.authorXu, Minya
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Yilong
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T22:58:35Z
dc.date.available2015-08-21T22:58:35Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Organizational Behavior, J. Organiz. Behav. 35, 1018–1041 (2014)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46173
dc.description.abstractTwo studies were conducted to address the potential nonlinear relationship between emotional exhaustion and voice. Study 1 developed and tested a model rooted in conservation of resources theory in which responses to emotional exhaustion are determined by individual-level and group-level conditions that influence the perceived safety and efficacy of voice and drive prohibitive voice behaviors by giving rise to either resource-conservation-based or resource-acquisition-based motivation. Specifically, there was a curvilinear (U-shaped) relationship between emotional exhaustion and prohibitive voice under conditions of (i) high job security and (ii) high interactional justice climate, but a linearly negative relationship when these resources were low. Study 2 replicated and extended these findings to include an empirical examination of these effects on promotive versus prohibitive voice. Results confirmed the findings of Study 1, provided evidence of differences in the nomological networks of promotive and prohibitive voice, and indicated that prohibitive voice is more salient to the experience of high emotional strain. Implications of the findings and areas for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank the National Science Foundation of China (no. 10901010 and no. 71273013), Fulbright Program sponsored by the US government, the Center for Statistical Science in Peking University, and the Key Laboratory of Mathematical Economics and Quantitative Finance (Peking University), Ministry of Education.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWhen do emotionally exhausted employees speak up? Exploring the potential curvilinear relationship between emotional exhaustion and voiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authoremotional exhaustionen_US
dc.subject.authorprohibitive voiceen_US
dc.subject.authorpromotive voiceen_US
dc.subject.authorjob securityen_US
dc.subject.authorinteractional justice climateen_US
dc.subject.authorcurvilinearen_US
dc.subject.authormulti-level designen_US


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