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dc.contributor.authorLance, Sara
dc.contributor.authorNenes, Athanasios
dc.contributor.authorMazzoleni, Claudio
dc.contributor.authorDubey, Manvendra
dc.contributor.authorGates, Harmony
dc.contributor.authorVarutbangkul, Varuntida
dc.contributor.authorRissman, Tracey A.
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Shane M.
dc.contributor.authorSorooshian, Armin
dc.contributor.authorFlagan, Richard C.
dc.contributor.authorSeinfeld, John H.
dc.contributor.authorFeingold, Graham
dc.contributor.authorJonsson H., Haflidi
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-04T15:11:17Z
dc.date.available2015-09-04T15:11:17Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46411
dc.descriptionFor Publication in Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres TexAQS/GoMACCS special issueen_US
dc.description.abstractIn-situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) measurements were obtained in the boundary layer over Houston, TX during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) campaign onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter. Polluted air masses in and out of cloudy regions were sampled for a total of 22 flights, with CCN measurements obtained for 17 of these flights. In this paper, we focus on CCN closure during two flights, within and downwind of the Houston regional plume and over the Houston Ship Channel. During both flights, air was sampled with particle concentrations exceeding 25,000 cm-3 and CCN concentrations exceeding 10,000 cm-3. CCN closure was evaluated by comparing measured CCN concentrations with those predicted on the basis of measured aerosol size distributions and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer particle composition. Different assumptions concerning the internally mixed chemical composition result in average CCN overprediction ranging from 3% to 36% (based on a linear fit). It is hypothesized that the externally-mixed fraction of the aerosol contributes much of the CCN closure scatter, while the internally-mixed fraction largely controls the overprediction bias. Finally, based on the droplet sizes of activated CCN, organics do not seem to impact, on average, the CCN activation kinetics.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleCCN Activity, Closure and Droplet Growth Kinetics of Houston Aerosol During the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorologyen_US
dc.description.funderWe acknowledge support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under contracts NA05OAR4310101 and NA06OAR4310082, the support of an NSF CAREER grant, and the Office of Naval Research. SL would like to acknowledge the support of a Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Presidential Fellowship and a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Advanced Study Program (ASP) Graduate Fellowship.en_US


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