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dc.contributor.authorReichelderfer, F.W.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T23:13:04Z
dc.date.available2015-09-09T23:13:04Z
dc.date.issued1928
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46444
dc.descriptionAuthor's Abstract, Bulletin Am. Met'l Soc., Aug. - Sept. 1928, Scientific Papers, Washington Meetingen_US
dc.description.abstractSince the development of naval aviation, the weather has become a new and very important factor in naval operations. This new importance is distinct from t he interests of safety of life at sea, for which provision is made for the Navy as for the merchant marine, by the broadcast storm warnings and advices of the Weather Bureau. To a modern Navy with special arms like aeronautics, special weather information is necessary. Aircraft cannot scout effectively when the cloud ceiling is low, nor when strong winds aloft seriously reduce the cruising radius. Planes cannot bomb when the targets are obscured by clouds or fog. On the other hand, detached clouds or a passing cloud layer may aid in a bombing mission. The special applications are almost endless. The more accurate and detailed the information of such conditions, the more effective the plans which can be made and the better the co-ordination of activities of the various arms of the Fleet.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titlePostgraduate Course in Aerology and Meteorology for Naval Officersen_US
dc.typeAbstracten_US


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