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dc.contributor.authorChen, Chung-An
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Evan M.
dc.contributor.authorWest, Jonathan P.
dc.contributor.authorEger, Robert J. III
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-24T23:14:09Z
dc.date.available2015-09-24T23:14:09Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationChen, C.-A., Berman, E. M., West, J. P., & Eger III, R. J. (2013). Community commitment in special districts. International public management journal, 16(1), 113-140.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/46671
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2013.796790en_US
dc.description.abstractSpecial districts now constitute about 42% of all U.S. jurisdictions, yet little is known about them. Some critics are concerned that special districts and their staffs have insufficient community commitment. This study, based on a national survey of senior managers in large special districts, examines activities and programs of special district managers that foster community building and engagement, including correlates of these. Study results reveal that special districts are committed to their communities and several strategies and conditions are associated with increased community commit- ment, such as jobs that focus on community interactions, service type, and ethics manage- ment, as well as, to a lesser extent, graduate degree qualifications and charters that specify the role of managers in promoting the public interest and in relation to the board.en_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCommunity commitment in special districtsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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