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dc.contributor.authorBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-14T21:35:54Z
dc.date.available2015-10-14T21:35:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Intelligence and Counter Intelligence, Vol. 21, pp. 448–460, 2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47009
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08850600701854094en_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral countries in South America have recently undertaken reforms of their intelligence systems, and other countries in the region are now beginning similar reforms. While in most cases the initial motivation was to bring the intelligence agencies under democratic civil control as one of the last phases of democratic consolidation, civilian governments and military leaders are today increasingly motivated to reform their intelligence systems in order to better respond to threats from organized crime and terrorism.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDemocracy and Effectiveness: Adapting Intelligence for the Fight Against Terrorismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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