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dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Larry R.
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Gail Fann
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-14T22:14:51Z
dc.date.available2015-10-14T22:14:51Z
dc.date.issued1994-04
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Business and Technical Communication, Vol. 8 No.2, April 1994, pp. 186-211en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47018
dc.description.abstractManagement scholars are quick to recognize the importance of communication in the manager's role. Barnard is frequently quoted as he defined "the function of the executive" as "first, to provide the system of communication ... " (7). More recently, Drucker posited communication as one of the five basic management operations, stating that communication in management has become a central concern to students and practitioners in all institutions. A good indication of the importance given to communication by management scholars is that every management textbook has a chapter dedicated to the topic. In addition, over 90% of organizations with 50 or more employees provide communication training (Lee).en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleManagers as Writers A Metanalysis of Research in Contexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US


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