Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBatteen, Mary L.
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Johnny R.
dc.contributor.authorBryan, Daniel W.
dc.contributor.authorBuch, Eric J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-21T01:19:59Z
dc.date.available2015-10-21T01:19:59Z
dc.date.issued2000-06-15
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 105, No. C6, pp. 14,173-14,195, June 15, 2000.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47165
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the northern Canary Current system (NCCS), results from four numerical experiments of increasing complexity are examined. Experiment 1, which uses seasonal wind forcing only, shows that as expected, wind forcing is the key generative mechanism for the current, upwelling, meander, eddy, and filament structures. Experiments 2 and 3, which have the additional effects of irregular coastline geometry, show the following: capes are areas for enhanced upwelling, extensive filaments, maximum current velocities, and enhanced growth of cyclonic meanders and eddies; an embayment like the Gulf of Cadiz is a primary region for anticyclonic meanders and eddy development. The results from the complex flow regime of Experiment 4, which has the additional effects of thermohaline gradients and Mediterranean Outflow, highlights the major characteristics and unique features (such as the generation of Meddles) of the NCCS with relatively close similarities to field observations.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleA modeling study of the coastal eastern boundary current system off Iberia and Moroccoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentOceanographyen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record