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dc.contributor.advisorBruneau, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorArredondo, Juan M.
dc.dateSep-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-06T18:22:02Z
dc.date.available2015-11-06T18:22:02Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47226
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the criminal networks used to penetrate Texas by the Mara Salvatrucha (MS 13) street gang. MS 13’s internal reach is analyzed by examining the existing and potential horizontal integration of the known cliques (gang cells). Additionally, the organizations’ existing reach and potential transnational reach are analyzed by examining the existing and potential vertical integration between its domestic and Central American components. The identification of MS 13’s criminal networks is completed by using a first-generation manual approach lens. This approach involves examining data to uncover associations between criminals, resulting in the creation of an association matrix that links MS 13 with affiliates. The research shows that MS 13 is a significant threat to public security in the state of Texas for two main reasons: proximity to cartels and demographics of the state. Research shows that criminal networks are already at work and that MS 13 should be taken seriously in Texas. The risk to Texas stems from the similarities, in terms of demographics and proximity to transnational cartels, to Los Angeles, California, where MS 13 originated.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/definingmarsalva1094547226
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDefining Mara Salvatrucha’s Texas networken_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderNieto-Gomez, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authortransnational criminal organizationsen_US
dc.subject.authorCentral Americaen_US
dc.subject.authorMexicoen_US
dc.subject.authorTexasen_US
dc.subject.authororganized crimeen_US
dc.subject.authorpolicyen_US
dc.subject.authorcriminalityen_US
dc.subject.authorstreet gangsen_US
dc.subject.authorprison gangsen_US
dc.subject.authorcartels.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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