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dc.contributor.advisorDahl, Erik
dc.contributor.authorCedros, Christopher R.
dc.dateSep-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-06T18:22:07Z
dc.date.available2015-11-06T18:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47237
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractWhile scholars study the radicalization process that produces lone-wolf terrorists in America, news stories regularly report on Muslim Americans leaving their local communities to join terrorist organizations. Currently, radicalizing individuals to act as lone wolves is the most successful method of Islamist attack on the American homeland. A novel approach to analyzing radicalization is employment of the prisoner’s dilemma, which examines the motivations behind individual decision-making. The prisoner’s dilemma is used by game theorists and international-relations scholars to demonstrate how persons who might ordinarily be expected to cooperate may actually work against each other and defect from previous agreements or understandings. Because lone-wolf attacks will likely continue to pose the most frequent threat to the U.S. homeland, it is imperative to learn how potential homegrown terrorists can be encouraged to identify with their local communities rather than defect from the social bonds of church, school, neighborhood, and workplace. This thesis explores how the prisoner’s dilemma may reveal ways to discourage radicalism in at-risk Muslim Americans.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleLone-wolf terrorist radicalization and the prisoner’s dilemma: ensuring mutual cooperation between at-risk Muslim Americans and local communitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorLone-wolfen_US
dc.subject.authorterroristen_US
dc.subject.authorterrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorlone offenderen_US
dc.subject.authorradicalizationen_US
dc.subject.authorde-radicalizationen_US
dc.subject.authorcounter-radicalizationen_US
dc.subject.authorinternational relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorIR theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorgame theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorprisoner’s dilemmaen_US
dc.subject.authorNidal Hasanen_US
dc.subject.authorFort Hooden_US
dc.subject.authorMohamed Mohamuden_US
dc.subject.authorPortland Car Bomben_US
dc.subject.authorMaajid Nawazen_US
dc.subject.authorradicalen_US
dc.subject.authorIslamismen_US
dc.subject.authorislamophobiaen_US
dc.subject.authormutual cooperationen_US
dc.subject.authormutual defectionen_US
dc.subject.authorsucker’s pay-offen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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