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dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorDietrich, Serena J.
dc.dateSep-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-06T18:22:13Z
dc.date.available2015-11-06T18:22:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47250
dc.description.abstractWhen the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was formed in 2003, 22 distinct agencies and directorates were consolidated into one organization. The Homeland Security Act of 2002, which mandated DHS’ creation, also required that functions performed by other agencies within the Department—those not related directly to securing the homeland—not be diminished or neglected. DHS has been challenged to produce annual budgets that clearly delineate homeland security and non-homeland security functions, making it difficult to assess whether legacy functions have been diminished. This thesis utilized a policy analysis research method to review budget exhibits from fiscal years 2004–2013 in order to analyze funding levels for DHS components’ specific legacy functions. Findings revealed that some functions have received decreased funding without a commensurate reduction in demand for that service. The need to unequivocally define which DHS activities are considered homeland security-related emerged as a recurring theme in the research as well. Using a multi-goal policy approach, the study assessed potential courses of action and ultimately makes two recommendations: to pursue a pilot test of modified budget submission requirements for a limited number of DHS components, and to benchmark business processes followed by the Departments of Interior and Commerce.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/protectingdhscom1094547250
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleProtecting DHS component pre-9/11 functions: improving visibility in budget exhibitsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderGeiger, Morgan
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorhomelanden_US
dc.subject.authorsecurityen_US
dc.subject.authorcomponentsen_US
dc.subject.authorbudgeten_US
dc.subject.authorfundingen_US
dc.subject.authorexhibitsen_US
dc.subject.authorfunctionsen_US
dc.subject.authorlegacyen_US
dc.subject.authoractivitiesen_US
dc.subject.authorpolicyen_US
dc.subject.authorOMBen_US
dc.subject.authorDHSen_US
dc.subject.authorCoast Guarden_US
dc.subject.authorCBPen_US
dc.subject.authorUSCISen_US
dc.subject.authorUSSSen_US
dc.subject.authorFEMAen_US
dc.subject.authorFLETCen_US
dc.description.serviceStrategic Resource Planning Branch Chief, U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Areaen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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