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dc.contributor.advisorRussell, James A.
dc.contributor.authorHancock, John S.
dc.dateSep-15
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-06T18:22:20Z
dc.date.available2015-11-06T18:22:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47269
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States and Saudi Arabia share a robust and complex security partnership today. This thesis explores the origins and development of U.S.-Saudi security cooperation between the late 1920s and early 1960s. During this time, U.S. leadership began to incorporate ideological objectives into their once largely analytical foreign policy. Scholarly historical literature, first-hand accounts of U.S. officials and government documents reveal that what once began as a business relationship in the 1930s rapidly developed into a security partnership designed to defend against the threat of Soviet communism by the 1950s. Initially interested in Saudi Arabia because of its oil, the United States began to view the kingdom with increasing geostrategic importance during the early Cold War while Saudi Arabia simultaneously benefited from U.S. military assistance for protection against regional threats. This thesis provides historical evidence and analysis of how U.S.–Saudi security cooperation helped the United States reach both its analytical and ideological goals in the past, which suggests that value exists in continuing this relationship today, despite the many challenges that it currently faces.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theeagleindesert1094547269
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe eagle in the desert: the origins of the U.S.-Saudi Arabian security partnershipen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBaylouny, Anne M.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorSaudi Arabiaen_US
dc.subject.authorAbdulaziz Ibn Sauden_US
dc.subject.authorsecurity cooperationen_US
dc.subject.authorFranklin D. Roosevelten_US
dc.subject.authorHarry S. Trumanen_US
dc.subject.authorDwight D. Eisenhoweren_US
dc.subject.authorJohn F. Kennedyen_US
dc.subject.authorCASOCen_US
dc.subject.authorSOCALen_US
dc.subject.authoroilen_US
dc.subject.authorpetroleum Dhahran Airfielden_US
dc.subject.authorOperation Hardsurfaceen_US
dc.subject.authorYemeni Civil Waren_US
dc.subject.authornuclearen_US
dc.subject.authorRussiaen_US
dc.subject.authorWahhabien_US
dc.subject.authorthe King Abdullah University of Science and Technologyen_US
dc.subject.authorKing Sauden_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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