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dc.contributor.authorSchrady, David A.
dc.dateAutumn 2002
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-12T19:03:27Z
dc.date.available2016-01-12T19:03:27Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationJoint Force Quarterly: JFQ, Autumn 2002, v.32, pp. 114-115en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47532
dc.description.abstractFour classic works on logistics have been reprinted in recent years under the imprint of the Naval War College Press. Although they share a common theme, none deals exclusively with logistics. Moreover, they are no less relevant today than when originally published. George Thorpe argued for establishing a joint staff in "Pure Logistics". The logistic snowball documented in "U.S. Naval Logistics in the Second World War by Duncan Ballantine is lamented in "Logistics in the National Defense" by Harry Eccles. And the case for expeditionary logistics is presented in "Beans, Bullets and Black Oil" by Worrall Carter. The books in this series are not intended only for logisticians; they should be read by every joint warfighter.en_US
dc.format.extent2 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleReading logistics, a Book Review by David A. Schrady of Pure Logistics by George C. Thorpe; U.S. Naval Logistics in the Second World War by Duncan S. Ballantine; Beans, Bullets and Black Oil by Worrall R. Carter; Logistics in the National Defense by Henry E. Ecclesen_US
dc.typeBook Reviewen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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