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dc.contributor.authorClunan, Anne L.
dc.dateAugust 30 - September 2, 2012
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T14:49:37Z
dc.date.available2016-02-04T14:49:37Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationDraft conference paper for the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, August 30-Sept 2, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47719
dc.descriptionDraft. Please do not cite without author’s permission.en_US
dc.description.abstractRussia's national interests have not been defined on the basis of conventional cost-benefit assessments, perceptions of material threat, or the identities projected onto Russia by other countries. Aspirations to regain the international great power status that Russians believe their country enjoyed during the tsarist and Soviet past were critical to the creation of its present national identity and national security interests. This paper asks how Russian elites came to have these national interests in social competition for great power status. In trying to explain how national interests are created, I present a novel aspirational constructivist approach that draws heavily on social psychology to answer three fundamental questions: What are the sources of national identity? Why do multiple identities come into contention? How does one of these candidate national identities come to dominate the others and become "social fact," acting as "the" national identity that defines a country's core national interests? In developing the answers, we gain a better understanding of how foreign “others” enter into the definition of Russia’s national identity and the formation of its interests.en_US
dc.format.extent28 p.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Political Science Associationen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleConstructivism’s micro-foundations: aspirations, social identity theory, and Russia's national interests (DRAFT)en_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US


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