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dc.contributor.authorMcNab, Robert M.
dc.contributor.authorMason, Edward
dc.contributor.otherDefense Resources Management Institute (DRMI)
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T16:46:36Z
dc.date.available2016-02-04T16:46:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-09
dc.identifier.citationSmall Wars and Insurgencies, v. 18, no.3 September 2007, pp.363-379en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47726
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09592310701674234en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge in the economics literature on the conduct of reconstruction activities in Iraq and Afghanistan. As stabilisation and reconstruction missions grow in importance for units deployed to these regions, it becomes more important to understand what activities can promote economic growth at the local level. While military operations focus on interdicting the insurgency, successful counter-insurgency campaigns have typically addressed the conditions conducive to the insurgency. Mitigating the incentives for individuals to participate in an insurgency is imperative. Well-crafted and timed reconstruction activities can, we argue, attenuate these incentives.en_US
dc.format.extent17 p.en_US
dc.publisherRoutledge/Taylor & Francisen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleReconstruction, the long tail and decentralization: an application to Iraq and Afghanistanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)


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