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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Kip
dc.contributor.authorKällhammer, Jan-Erik
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-12T19:49:27Z
dc.date.available2016-02-12T19:49:27Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Annual Meeting, v.56, no.1, September 2012, pp. 2246-2250en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47791
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561473en_US
dc.description.abstractRegression analysis of driver ratings of alerts issued by an in-vehicle active safety system during a field operational test identified contextual factors that influence driver acceptance of system alerts. A nominal characterization of pedestrian location and two quantitative measures of pedestrian motion predict more than 60% of the variability in driver ratings and do not interact. This finding is empirical support for the classic notion of the field of safe travel (Gibson & Crooks, 1938).en_US
dc.format.extent6 p.en_US
dc.publisherHuman Factors Societyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleExperimental evidence for the field of safe travelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Researchen_US


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