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dc.contributor.advisorDoerr, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorOkyere-Boateng, Kwabena O.
dc.dateDec-15
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:37:55Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:37:55Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47832
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe Naval Aviation Maintenance Program recognizes cannibalization as a viable management tool when properly used in aviation squadrons. Squadrons consequently practice cannibalization in an attempt to reduce gaps in their logistical and maintenance support systems. This thesis analyzed cannibalizations on the MV-22 aircraft platform to examine how the practice varied between squadrons in the community, which specific components drove cannibalizations, and how the practice of cannibalization affected aircraft availability. Using descriptive and inferential statistics, cannibalization data from 2010 to 2014 for 13 selected MV-22 squadrons were analyzed under six selected categories. All MV-22 components cannibalized during that period were also analyzed to examine the top cannibalization drivers and how those components changed over time. Lastly, statistical tests were performed to uncover how cannibalizations affected aircraft availability. The analysis revealed some squadrons as better performers at cannibalization than others, and that squadrons also varied under reasons for cannibalization, maintenance hour documentation, partial mission capable cannibalizations, and cannibalizations on deployment. The statistical test also revealed that cannibalizations had little to no effect on MV-22 aircraft availability. Recommendations for maintenance data system improvements were provided along with suggested MV-22 best cannibalization practices.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleA between-squadron analysis of cannibalization on the MV-22en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderSummers, Donald
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorNAMPen_US
dc.subject.authorV-22en_US
dc.subject.authorcannibalizationen_US
dc.subject.authoraircraft maintenanceen_US
dc.subject.authoraviationen_US
dc.subject.authorreadinessen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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