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dc.contributor.advisorKiernan, Kathleen
dc.contributor.advisorRollins, John
dc.contributor.authorTupper, Shawn P.
dc.dateDec-15
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:38:22Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:38:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47887
dc.description.abstractThe General Services Administration accesses building-automation system technology that runsfederal facility processes such as HVAC, lighting, elevators, and access control via active Internet connections. Currently, these networks are not secure, despite legislation requiring them to be. This thesis investigated whether the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) could leverage existing federal laws, presidential directives, executive orders, government frameworks, and its current cyber and investigative capabilities to establish a strategy to secure federal facility building-automation system cyber networks, or if additional resources are needed The research uncovered significant vulnerabilities and threats to federal facility building-automation system networks, which, if exploited, could cause a significant impact on the American people, who are dependent on services offered by federal agencies such as the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Social Security Administration. A qualitative research method was used to interpret and analyze government and nongovernment institutional studies and reports, existing cybersecurity frameworks, and scholarly journals to determine which of the policy options offered would provide the best strategy for the DHS moving forward. The thesis concluded that utilizing a combination of private contractors and existing DHS assets would provide the best option.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/buildingutomatio1094547887
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBuilding automation system cyber networks: an unmitigated risk to federal facilitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorindustrial control systemsen_US
dc.subject.authorbuilding automation systemsen_US
dc.subject.authorcybersecurityen_US
dc.subject.authorFederal Protective Service (FPS)en_US
dc.subject.authorUnited States Secret Service (USSS)en_US
dc.subject.authorIndustrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT)en_US
dc.subject.authorGeneral Services Administration (GSA)en_US
dc.subject.authorShodanen_US
dc.subject.authorEINSTEINen_US
dc.subject.authorCSETen_US
dc.subject.authorDHSen_US
dc.subject.authorDepartment of Homeland Securityen_US
dc.description.serviceSenior Special Agent, U.S. Department of Homeland Securityen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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