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dc.contributor.advisorWeiner, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorBean, Adam T.
dc.dateDec-15
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:38:27Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:38:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47899
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the significance of U.S. military aviation mishaps inJapan. Such accidents routinely create political controversy in Okinawa, but some incidents draw more attention or ridicule than others. This study evaluates the conditions that shape the variation in how damaging aviation mishaps are to the maintenance of American bases, which are crucial to American regional strategy. Using qualitative methods, this research analyzes five U.S. military crashes in Okinawa: the 2004 CH-53 crash at Okinawa International University, the 2013 HH-60 Air Force crash near Camp Hansen, the 1988 CH-46 crash in Kunigami, the 1992 CH-46 crash at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, and the 1959 F-100D crash at Miyamori Primary School. This study concludes that the four most significant crash factors in Okinawa are whether a crash occurred in a township, whether civilian fatalities/injuries were involved, whether there was a cluster of recent U.S. military accidents, and whether American post-crash public relations was poor. An accident involving MCAS Futenma or the U.S. Marines will be more highly politicized. Thus, a Futenma-based aircraft crashing into the township and killing civilians represents a worst-case scenario. Three crash factors that the U.S. military has the ability to influence are post-crash public relations, crash-site management, and local interagency cooperation.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleU.S. military aviation mishaps in Japan and Okinawan political controversyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMabry, Tristan J.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S. military aviation accidentsen_US
dc.subject.authorAmerican basing presenceen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S.-Japan relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorOkinawan public opinionen_US
dc.subject.authorpolitical protestsen_US
dc.subject.authorMarine Corps Air Station Futenmaen_US
dc.subject.authorpublic relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorinteragency cooperationen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanese compensation politicsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia and the Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia and the Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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