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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorJefferson, Karrie Ann
dc.dateDec-15
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:39:05Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:39:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47968
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSince September 11, 2001, many governments have considered developing national identity management systems. Beyond identification, politicians and proponents of these systems have touted such system benefits as combating terrorism, preventing identity theft, facilitating travel, and combating illegal work and benefit fraud. For these reasons, theUnited States and United Kingdom both considered variations of these systems. While the United Kingdom passed the Identity Cards Act of 2006 and spent several years developing a national identity management system before ultimately scrapping the scheme in 2010, theUnited States sought to secure further the existing means of identification—driver’s licenses and identity cards—through the passage of the REAL ID Act. Both measures met with widespread resistance. What does an examination of resistance to nationwide identity management schemes in theUnited States and United Kingdom reveal about the nature of national identity management systems and identity cards, and what does this resistance tell policymakers and security officials who promote such schemes? Through a comparative analysis of the REAL ID Act implementation and the National Identity Scheme, this thesis shows that Anglophone, common-law nations experience the same inhibiting factors, whether or not they attempt to implement a national identity management system or an identity card on a national scale.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/whatsinnamecompa1094547968
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titleWhat’s in a name: a comparative analysis of the United States’ REAL ID Act and the United Kingdom’s national identity schemeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMorag, Nadav
dc.contributor.departmentHomeland Security, Washington, Dc
dc.contributor.departmentHomeland Security, Washington, Dcen_US
dc.subject.authorpersonal identity managementen_US
dc.subject.authornational identity management systemen_US
dc.subject.authornational identity carden_US
dc.subject.authoridentity carden_US
dc.subject.authornationwide identity systemen_US
dc.subject.authordriver’s licenseen_US
dc.subject.authorREAL ID Acten_US
dc.subject.authornational identity schemeen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.subject.authornational identity systemen_US
dc.subject.authorpublic policyen_US
dc.subject.authorprivacyen_US
dc.subject.authorcivil rightsen_US
dc.subject.authorcivil libertiesen_US
dc.subject.authorpublic acceptanceen_US
dc.subject.authorterrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorsecurityen_US
dc.description.servicePolicy Analyst, Office of Biometric Identity Management, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DCen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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