Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBacolod, Marigee
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jacob A.
dc.dateDec-15
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T18:39:06Z
dc.date.available2016-02-17T18:39:06Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/47970
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIncreasing diversity and equal opportunity in the military is a congressional and executive priority. At the same time, improving recruiting practices is a priority of the commandant of the Marine Corps. In an effort to provide information to the Marine Corps that may improve recruiting practice and enable retention of a higher quality and more diverse officer corps, probit econometric models are estimated to identify significant factors an officer candidate possesses prior to accession in predicting the probability of career success, as determined by career designation, and the probability of career failure, as determined by separation under unfavorable conditions and receiving a legal action while commissioned. Results showed demographic characteristics, such as race and marital status, significantly predict career success and career failure. In addition, officers with reenrollment waivers for withdrawal or dismissal from OCS, USNA, and NROTC proved less likely to be selected for career designation and more likely to be separated under unfavorable conditions. Based on the findings, the Marine Corps should reevaluate whether to grant reenrollment waivers to officer candidates, should improve data collection, and strongly consider using non-cognitive assessment during the officer candidate screening process. The researcher also recommends ways to improve the models used in this study.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleSignificant pre-accession factors predicting success or failure during a Marine Corps officer’s initial service obligationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMyung, Noah
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorMarineen_US
dc.subject.authorofficeren_US
dc.subject.authorcandidateen_US
dc.subject.authoraccessionen_US
dc.subject.authorsuccessen_US
dc.subject.authorfailureen_US
dc.subject.authorseparationen_US
dc.subject.authorcareer designationen_US
dc.subject.authorprobiten_US
dc.subject.authorregressionen_US
dc.subject.authorpredicten_US
dc.subject.authorprobabilityen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record