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dc.contributor.authorBlank, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Brett D.
dc.contributor.authorBurks, Robert
dc.contributor.authorBelmont, Philip J. Jr.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T20:40:23Z
dc.date.available2016-02-23T20:40:23Z
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.identifier.citation2012 Jul 1;35(7):e1022-7.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48004
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi: 10.3928/01477447-20120621-14en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough greater trochanteric pain syndrome is thought to be a common musculoskeletal disorder, little has been reported on the incidence rates of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and demographic risk factors of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in a United States military population. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the rate of greater trochanteric pain syndrome per 1000 person-years, controlling for sex, race, age, rank, and branch of service. The overall unadjusted incidence rate of greater trochanteric pain syndrome was 2.03 per 1000 person-years. Women had a significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio for greater trochanteric pain syndrome of 5.03 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.91-5.16). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for White servicemembers compared with Black servicemembers was 1.36 (95% CI, 1.32-1.40). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for the 40+ age group compared with the 25 to 29 age group was 2.81 (95% CI, 2.68-2.95). Compared with junior officers, junior and senior enlisted ranks had an increased adjusted incidence rate ratio of 1.94 (95% CI, 1.84-2.04) and 1.17 (95% CI, 1.12-1.23), respectively. Compared with the Navy, each branch of service had an increased adjusted incidence rate ratio, with the Army at 2.90 (95% CI, 2.80-3.01), the Marines at 1.96 (95% CI, 1.87-2.07), and the Air Force at 1.33 (95% CI, 1.27-1.38). Female servicemembers had a five-fold greater incidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Increasing age, enlisted rank groups, and service in the Army, Marines, or Air Force were also significant risk factors.en_US
dc.publisherOrthopedicsen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleIncidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in active duty US military servicemembersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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