Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Deborah E.
dc.contributor.authorBaho, Sally M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-29T17:19:40Z
dc.date.available2016-02-29T17:19:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-15
dc.identifier.citationGibbons, Deborah E., and Sally M. Baho. (2016) "Peacekeeping and women's rights: Latin American countries rise to the challenge." Women, Peace and Security, Case Studies: Center For Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CFE-DM).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48038
dc.description.abstractUnited Nations peacekeepers did little in the 20th century to protect individuals, as they focused mainly on reducing large-scale conflict. Many of the nations in which peacekeepers served, such as the Central African Republic, Cote d’Ivoire, and Sudan, suffered under governments that intentionally and often viciously violated the rights of their own people. United Nations (UN) peacekeepers, rather than intervening to save civilians, had occasionally been perpetrators of violence, especially against women. Eventually, public pressure led the United Nations Security Council to pass a series of resolutions demanding protection for civilians and inclusion of women during peacekeeping operations. By June of 2014, about 4.5% of deployed UN peacekeepers were women, and UN mandates had begun to include protection of civilians.en_US
dc.publisherCenter For Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CFE-DM)
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titlePeacekeeping and women's rights: Latin American countries rise to the challengeen_US
dc.typeReporten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record