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dc.contributor.authorGregg, Heather S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-01T17:24:40Z
dc.date.available2016-03-01T17:24:40Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationForeign policy analysis, v.6, 2010, pp. 237-255en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48046
dc.description.abstractThis article compares the instruments of statecraft used to construct grand strategies in the early years of the Cold War—the Truman and Eisenhower administrations—with the Bush administration’s grand strategy and the Global War on Terror (GWOT). It argues that the Bush strategy relied heavily on the military instrument of statecraft in attempts of defeating Al-Qaeda and did not develop robust and concerted diplomatic, psychological and economic tools to undermine Al-Qaeda’s ideology and influence. The early days of the Cold War hold valuable lessons for crafting an integrated grand strategy that can fight both the Al-Qaeda network and its ideology.en_US
dc.format.extent19 p.en_US
dc.publisherInternational Studies Associationen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCrafting a better US grand strategy in the post-September 11 world: lessons from the early years of the Cold Waren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysisen_US


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