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dc.contributor.advisorLuhrs, Claudia C.
dc.contributor.advisorHaegel, Nancy M.
dc.contributor.authorBickings, Conrad M.
dc.dateSep-14
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T23:26:32Z
dc.date.available2016-03-03T23:26:32Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48128
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractReproducing the structure of biological materials has rendered synthetic materials with remarkable properties. Here we studied the features of a rhinoceros beetle, Dynastes Hercules, aiming to understand its structural components and relate them to its properties. This beetle changes color, from yellow-green to completely black in diverse humidity conditions due to a porous layer that absorbs water. The objectives of the work included the characterization of the reflectance spectra of the porous layer in the visible and shortwave infrared regions, and, for the first time, determine its mechanical properties. This work provides the foundation for a longer-term objective: design and generate synthetic materials that mimic the functionality of biological materials. In this particular case, the new multifunctional material could find application as lightweight camouflage effective under visible and shortwave infrared conditions. Elytra samples taken from dead specimens of Dynastes Hercules were sectioned and prepared for optical property characterization and mechanical testing. Spectral reflectance measurements were taken under wet and dry conditions which showed a similar signature to foliage. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy along with Focus Ion Beam cross-sectional analysis were used to examine the pores and tubular structures that allow water into the sponge-like layer that promotes the color changes. Tensile tests were used to determine Young’s Modulus and tensile strength of the elytra. Hardness and density measurements are also included. The measurements rendered specific modulus and specific strength values similar to wood. In addition, attempts to mimic the porous layer using anodizing techniques to render tubular inorganic structures are reported.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBioinspired composites design: mechanical and optical characterization of the Hercules beetle elytraen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)
dc.subject.authorBioinspired materialsen_US
dc.subject.authorShortwave Infrareden_US
dc.subject.authorSWIRen_US
dc.subject.authorBiomimeticsen_US
dc.subject.authorCamouflageen_US
dc.subject.authorAnodizing Titaniumen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMechanical Engineer and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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