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dc.contributor.advisorGoshorn, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorGutierrez, Juan J.
dc.dateDec-09
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T23:26:34Z
dc.date.available2016-03-03T23:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48135
dc.description.abstractThe requirement to monitor a field operator’s vital signs and location was articulated through the Counter Narcoterrorism Technology Program Office. The initial concept was to equip a soldier with a blue force tracker like device, which would be able to monitor and transmit the person’s life signs, as well as their positional coordinates. This thesis focuses on the development of BioRAPIDS (Biomedical-Remote Automated Position Identification System), a capability within a broader sensor management, net-centric, system of systems to monitor, transmit, and display Heart Rate and GPS location. A spiral developmental model was implemented in order to select and integrate components, conduct testing, and provide feedback to the process. Based on system requirements, Commercial-off-the-Shelf/Government-off-the-Shelf COTS/GOTS components were chosen and adapted to meet the required interfaces. Component and subassembly interactions were then modeled using Integration Definition for Functional Modeling (IDEF0) modeling language to ensure traceability between functions and components. The culmination of the 10-month project was the creation of a system; starting at the idea phase through the delivery of a proof-of-concept prototype. Accompanying the created system is this thesis, which documents the development process, records testing analysis, and captures potential future courses of action.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theuseofnetworkc1094548135
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe use of network-centric devices to monitor bio-status and location of field personnel, distributed through an IP based sensor fusion architecture and displayen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderEhlert, James
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.subject.authorNetworken_US
dc.subject.authorBio-statusen_US
dc.subject.authorPersonnel Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.authorSensor Fusionen_US
dc.subject.authorBlue Force Trackingen_US
dc.subject.authorBiotelemetryen_US
dc.subject.authorSituation Awarenessen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Systems Engineering Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSystems Engineering Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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