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dc.contributor.advisorGiraldo, Jeanne K.
dc.contributor.advisorTrinkunas, Harold A.
dc.contributor.authorTrismen, Eric D.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:43:16Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:43:16Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/4825
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues liberal theories of peace fail to explain the relationship that exists between Chile and Peru. Democratic and Economic Integration theories posit that democratization and economic integration foster cooperation. Yet, these do not accurately reflect the current state of relations. I posit such an explanation must take into account the preferences of actors, and their ability to act on those preferences. I focus on the executive, the military and the legislature. I apply this framework to aspects of Chile-Peru relations from 1968 to today. I find that balance of power best defines the period 1968 to 1980. Yet, competition is tempered by balance of identity and the nontraditional use of confidence building measures. The period 1980 to 2000 is characterized as an era of peaceful relations. Under various stages of democratization, executives are increasingly able to act on their preferences. Subordination of the military allows them freedom to pursue cooperative measures to help legitimize their administrations. Their ability to foster cooperation even reaches to nondemocratic neighbors. Since 2000, bilateral relations have deteriorated despite attempts by executives to strengthen cooperation. This is largely due to constraints placed on Peruvian executives because of domestic politics.en_US
dc.format.extentx, 105 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshInterstate relationsen_US
dc.titleAssessing the potential for interstate conflict between Chile and Peru a political economy approachen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc319714703
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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