Publication:
Flight plight: an examination of contemporary humanitarian immigration from Honduras, Cuba, and Syria to the United States with considerations for national security

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Authors
Ventura, Catherine Schroeck
Subjects
immigration
migration
refugees
asylum
Syria
Honduras
Cuba
empathy
storytelling
narrative
Cuban Adjustment Act
Temporary Protected Status
deferred action
parole
policy
juveniles
Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
deportation
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
Department of State (DOS)
diversity lottery
visas
national strategy
humanitarian
background checks
national security
Advisors
Halladay, Carolyn
Nieto-Gomez, Rodrigo
Date of Issue
2016-03
Date
Mar-16
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis examines contemporary U.S. immigration for humanitarian populations from Honduras, Cuba, and Syria. Humanitarian immigration refers to refugees, asylum seekers, and those who are forcibly displaced from their homelands. The study explores how the United States can balance its identity as a nation of immigrants with its increasing security concerns within forced migrant populations. The research describes various philosophies of and motives for migration and the United States’ role as an international destination for refugees. The study also provides a comprehensive review of all U.S. humanitarian immigration programs available to forced migrants from Honduras, Cuba, and Syria. These unique reviews, or case studies, are introduced with descriptions of each country’s social, political, and historical context for migration and feature fictional scenarios in which immigrant families interact directly with country conditions and the U.S. humanitarian immigration programs available to them. Finally, the thesis reviews national security concerns presented by humanitarian immigration programs and explains how national priorities and legislative remedies can temper public fear.
Type
Thesis
Description
Department
National Security Affairs
National Security Affairs
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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