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dc.contributor.advisorHatch, Bill
dc.contributor.advisorSeagren, Chad
dc.contributor.authorWall, Jessica M.
dc.dateMar-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T21:19:07Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T21:19:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48489
dc.description.abstractThis research is in response to a request from the United States Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office. The Marine Corps has identified its reliance on energy resources as a real threat to military security and a drag on the logistics tail of expeditionary operations. This research recommends that the Marine Corps prioritize development of the existing Unit Energy Manager program to address operational energy capability requirements. Long-term solutions require updating existing formal training and education standards and assignment of a new free military occupational specialty on the Marine Corps tables of organization. The Expeditionary Energy Office and Marine Corps Installations Command have stood up to centrally manage policy and directives for Marine Corps energy management; however, the organization has not institutionalized mission essential tasks nor developed personnel training in order to field operational energy managers to the fleet. This research identifies the federal and military policies and guidance in place to manage operational and installation energy issues, as well as the manpower billets in place to support centralized management. The research further examines the existing force structure that supports training of energy management professionals within the Marine Corps.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/anexaminationofm1094548489
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAn examination of Marine Corps energy initiatives and the supporting manpower force structureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorUnited States Marine Corps (USMC)en_US
dc.subject.authorExpeditionary Energy Office (E2O)en_US
dc.subject.authoroperational energyen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary occupational specialty (MOS)en_US
dc.subject.authormanpoweren_US
dc.subject.authorbillet classificationen_US
dc.subject.authortables of organization (T/O)en_US
dc.subject.authormanagementen_US
dc.subject.authorethosen_US
dc.subject.authorroles and responsibilitiesen_US
dc.subject.authortraining and readinessen_US
dc.subject.authoreducationen_US
dc.subject.authorbehavioren_US
dc.subject.authortotal force structure processen_US
dc.subject.authorinstallations and logisticsen_US
dc.subject.authorUnit Energy Manager (UEM)en_US
dc.subject.authormission essential tasken_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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