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dc.contributor.advisorShen, Yu-Chu
dc.contributor.advisorHartmann, Latika
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Jesse-LaRou
dc.dateMar-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T21:19:07Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T21:19:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48490
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing attention from the military to understand the potential benefit of enhancing service members’ meals with omega-3 nutrients to improve their overall mental health. This research warrants attention due to the increase in the number of military members returning from wars with mental health issues such as PTSD and depression, and an increasing number of military members who are medically discharged for these mental health issues. Using the 2011 DOD Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel, we analyze the association between fish oil consumption and mental health outcomes. This analysis focuses on three outcomes that capture a service members’ state of mental health (depression, post-traumatic stress [PTS], suicide ideation), and whether service members sought mental health therapy within the past 12 months. We estimated logistic regression models where the key independent variables were various levels of fish oil use (none [reference group], light, moderate, and daily use). For each outcome, we estimated five models that include control variables in the following categories: demographics, combat exposure, lifestyle—activities, lifestyle—nutrition, and lifestyle-stress. In addition, we estimated a model on the Navy-only population to examine whether Navy personnel might exhibit different patterns than DOD as a whole. We also explore whether there are gender differences in the association between fish oil usage and mental health outcomes. The survey did not show higher fish oil consumption to be associated with lower incidences of depression, post-traumatic stress, or suicide ideation among all the services. Navy-only analysis has similar findings, except that one of the models indicated that light fish oil use lowered the likelihood of Navy personnel experiencing high PTS in the past 30 days. Our recommendations are to analyze the survey data across all years it has been given to see if there are trends, encourage the military to place more emphasis on lifestyle choices pertaining to health and nutrition, and urge the military to help service members with stress and anxiety.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/associationbetwe1094548490
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleAssociation between fish oil consumption and the incidence of mental health issues among active duty military personnelen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authorMental healthen_US
dc.subject.authorfish oilen_US
dc.subject.authoromega-3en_US
dc.subject.authorPTSDen_US
dc.subject.authordepressionen_US
dc.subject.authorsuicide ideationen_US
dc.subject.authormilitaryen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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