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dc.contributor.advisorHatch, William
dc.contributor.advisorSeagren, Chad
dc.contributor.advisorTick, Simona
dc.contributor.authorClark, Eric S.
dc.dateMar-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T21:19:16Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T21:19:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48505
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the effect of the timing of graduation education attainment on retention of officers within the Surface Warfare community. Navy Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) commissioned between fiscal years 1999 and 2003 were classified as having no graduate degree, or earning their master’s prior to service, before five years of service, between five and 10 years of service, and after 10 years of service. Differential bivariate probit analysis is used to determine the effect of the timing of graduated education attainment on retention to the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth year of service as well as promotion to O-4. The findings show that SWO Department Heads who earn a master’s degree at any point within their careers are more likely to retain. Officers who earned a graduate degree before commissioning or prior to five years of commissioned service are no more likely to retain, as compared with SWOs with no graduate education, while whose who obtained graduate education after five years of service are significantly more likely to retain. In addition, the findings show that Department Heads earning a master’s degree at any point within their careers are more likely to promote to O-4, compared with those who had not earned a master’s degree. Graduate education shows to have the potential of a strategic investment in human capital that can be used by the Navy as a retention tool. Future work can address the potential selection bias associated with higher retention of those with graduate education attained after five years of commissioned service by SWOs who might be already committed to a Navy career.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theeffectofgradu1094548505
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleThe effect of graduate education timing on the retention of surface warfare officersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authormanpoweren_US
dc.subject.authormanningen_US
dc.subject.authorSWOen_US
dc.subject.authorcareer planningen_US
dc.subject.authorgraduate educationen_US
dc.subject.authorretentionen_US
dc.subject.authorsubspecialtyen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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