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dc.contributor.advisorBacolod, Marigee
dc.contributor.advisorHartmann, Latika
dc.contributor.authorFodor, James N.
dc.dateMar-16
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T21:19:25Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T21:19:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48521
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe existing literature suggests there are no significant outcome differences between online and traditional degree programs in the civilian sector. Few studies have looked for such differences within military schools and colleges, specifically. Given the growing popularity of online and distance education degree programs, we study the impact of this particular mode of instructional delivery on the academic and subsequent job performance of military officer students enrolled at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). Using propensity score matching, we estimate the effects that being a distance learning (DL) student has on four performance outcomes: grade point average, graduation, promotion, and separation. We further subdivide the sample into various subgroups based on military service branch, warfare community, academic preparation, and school within NPS to determine the heterogeneous effects of DL within each subsample. The DL students studied performed significantly worse than equivalent resident students on every measurement. We found NPS students enrolled in DL degree programs obtain GPAs approximately half a letter grade lower, are less likely to graduate, are less likely to promote, and are more likely to separate from military service than their NPS resident student counterparts. Given these results, it is imperative to conduct additional research to ascertain what makes distance learning inferior to residency at the Naval Postgraduate School.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/distancelearning1094548521
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleDistance learning: the impact of not being a resident studenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)en_US
dc.subject.authordistance learningen_US
dc.subject.authorTQPRen_US
dc.subject.authorgraduationen_US
dc.subject.authorpromotionen_US
dc.subject.authorseparationen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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