Crowds as complex adaptive systems: strategic implications for law enforcement

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Authors
Leverone, Robert H.
Subjects
crowd control
police policy
police training
police equipment
Ferguson
Keene
systems theory
complex adaptive systems
complexity theory
chaos theory
nonlinear interaction
self-organized criticality
self-organization
emergence
adaptive behavior
metis
Santa Fe Institute
Complexity Lab
Advisors
Brannan, David
Date of Issue
2016-03
Date
Mar-16
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Law enforcement attempts to control unruly crowds have come under increased scrutiny in light of recent unrest in Ferguson, Missouri; Baltimore, Maryland; and other locales across the United States. Resultant criticism is forcing law enforcement agencies nationwide to review their civil-unrest policies. Crowd behavior resulting from police actions is an important component of crowd control. Viewing crowds from a systems perspective, as done in this thesis, provides powerful new insights to help law enforcement assess potential crowd behaviors. Through this new awareness, this thesis makes recommendations regarding policies, training, and equipment that law enforcement can use to make better-informed decisions related to crowd control.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs
National Security Affairs
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
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Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
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