Developing and applying synthesis models of emerging space systems

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Authors
Ordonez, Michael M.
Subjects
Space systems
synthesis models
model-based systems engineering
small satellite
design
acquisitions
MILSATCOM
ISR
feasibility analysis
trade space analysis
Advisors
Racoosin, Charles
Pugsley, Thomas
Date of Issue
2016-03
Date
Mar-16
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The Department of Defense’s (DOD) large satellites provide robust capabilities, but they are ill designed to combat emerging threats and concerns like anti-satellite weapons and a shrinking defense budget. Small satellites are a potential solution to this challenge, but the technology is too nascent for the DOD to deploy. This thesis addressed the DOD’s need for further research on small satellites by providing a set of decision support tools that enables the exploration of small satellite physical trade-offs early in the conceptual design phase of the DOD space acquisition process. Early phases of the systems engineering process were used to identify DOD small satellite requirements and key input factors and output responses that drove meta-model development through the use of model-based systems engineering. Microsoft Excel and JMP software were employed to build synthesis models used in the decision support tools developed. The decision support tools analyzed the relationship between small satellite design inputs and outputs to provide trade space insights that can assist DOD space acquisition professionals in making better decisions in the conceptual design phase. More informed decision-making in the space acquisition process might preserve valuable DOD resources that may have otherwise been wasted.
Type
Thesis
Description
Includes supplementary material
Series/Report No
Department
Systems Academic Group
Systems Academic Group
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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