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dc.contributor.advisorEhlert, James
dc.contributor.authorEfe, GoÌ khan Ş.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:43:26Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:43:26Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/4883
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractVideo cameras have increased in usefulness specific to military applications over the course of the past four decades providing remotely controlled and viewed high-definition color images both at day and night conditions making them ideal for defense applications including force protection, critical asset monitoring, and perimeter surveillance. This is a result of many advances in technology including production of high-definition sensors, developing new video compression algorithms and IP capabilities, auto tracking features, image stabilization etc. Furthermore, the evolution of wireless networking technology and capability provides new practical options to gather Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) information. As part of Cooperative Operations and Applied Science and Technology Studies (COASTS) international field experimentation program, multiple cameras are being implemented and fused to provide persistent or near-persistent ISR. Cameras, including low-light versions, utilize both wired and wireless communication networks to deliver real-time video data for the use of decision makers. The goal of this research is to test and evaluate performance and suitability of low-light cameras in a variety of operating environments as an option to more expensive infrared, thermal, or night vision applications. Ultimately, it will be clear whether the configuration of the Kestrel Technology Group (KTG) All Light / All Night (ALAN) camera is efficient for ISR missions depending on the test results. Understanding the true capabilities and limitations of the ALAN camera and its applicability to a wireless network by using an aerial vehicle will allow appropriate application and operation for military purposes.en_US
dc.format.extentxx, 103 p. : col. ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshDetectorsen_US
dc.subject.lcshWireless communication systemsen_US
dc.subject.lcshTelecommunication systemsen_US
dc.titleTesting and evaluation of low-light sensors to enhance intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) and real-time situational awarenessen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderSankar, Pat.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.serviceTurkish Air Force author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc319535167
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Technology Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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