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dc.contributor.authorElsberry, Russell
dc.contributor.authorBoothe, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBlackerby, Jason
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Tara
dc.date2006
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T20:10:23Z
dc.date.available2016-06-06T20:10:23Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/48846
dc.descriptionExtended Abstracten_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, track forecasts by dynamical models have improved, and subsequently, the consensus track forecast has become a reliable “starting point” for the forecaster. However, Blackerby (2005) and Lambert (2005) have shown that improvements of intensity forecasts have been slower in coming (Fig. 1). Given the lack of skill of intensity forecast techniques, a consensus of such techniques does not perform as well as a consensus of track forecasts, and the lack of a good consensus makes the forecast of intensity a daunting task.en_US
dc.format.extent3 p.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAccuracy of Tropical Cyclone Intensity Forecasts in the North Pacific and Atlanticen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US


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