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dc.contributor.authorHaegel, N.M.
dc.contributor.authorChristian, T.
dc.contributor.authorScandrett, C.
dc.contributor.authorNorman, A. G.
dc.contributor.authorPickett, Evan
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Homan
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T22:39:49Z
dc.date.available2016-07-21T22:39:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-17
dc.identifier.citationApplied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/49277
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4902316
dc.description.abstractDirect imaging of minority electron transport via the spatially resolved recombination luminescence signature has been used to determine carrier diffusion lengths in GaInP as a function of doping. Minority electron mobility values are determined by performing time resolved photoluminescence measurements of carrier lifetime on the same samples. Values at 300 K vary from~2000 to 400 cm2/V s and decrease with increasing doping. Anisotropic diffusion lengths and strongly polarized photoluminescence are observed, resulting from lateral composition modulation along the [110] direction. We report anisotropic mobility values associated with carrier transport parallel and perpendicular to the modulation direction.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUSDOE
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Institute of Physics
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDoping dependence and anisotropy of minority electron mobility in molecular beam epitaxy-grown p type GaInPen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.funderAC05-06OR23100
dc.description.funderDEAC36-08GO28308
dc.description.funderThis work was supported at the Naval Postgraduate School in part by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR-0804527 and in part by the NPS Energy Academic Group with funding from the Navy Energy Coordination Office. T.C. acknowledges support from the Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Fellowship Program (DOE SCGF), made possible in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, administered by ORISE-ORAU under Control No. DE-AC05-06OR23100. TRPL work at NREL was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under DEAC36-08GO28308.


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