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dc.contributor.advisorClunan, Anne
dc.contributor.advisorEsparza, Diego
dc.contributor.authorEuans, Christopher W.
dc.date16-Jun
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-02T19:34:54Z
dc.date.available2016-08-02T19:34:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/49455
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the establishment of plurinationalism in Bolivia and its relationship with a rentier economy based in extractive energy resources. In the early 2000s, Bolivia became part of a Leftist shift in governments across South America. With the election of Bolivia's first indigenous president, Evo Morales, Bolivia cast aside neo-liberal economic policies and nationalized many of its industries, the largest being the hydrocarbon and oil industry. Utilizing strong cultural and historical symbols, Morales gained overwhelming support from the mestizo and indigenous communities. The promise of self-determination and autonomy for self-identifying indigenous groups propelled Bolivian plurinationalism forward as the answer for change in a government that finally represented the traditionally repressed majority. Energy rents supported universal pensions, education, and maternal-infant health care; these programs became the primary tools for populist-style redistribution. This thesis analyzes the effectiveness of these social programs in establishing national cohesion and identity among the Bolivian population. A historical comparison of Bolivia before plurinationalism, announced in 2005, and during the establishment of plurinationalism, 2005Ð2013, is utilized to gauge the effectiveness of the new government policy in creating national cohesion. The primary finding of this thesis is the that effective impact of social programs on national cohesion is minimal. Instead of greater Bolivian national cohesion, the primary outcome of these programs is the reinforcement of the social divide between the Morales government supporters in the western highlands and autonomy seeking groups in the eastern lowlands.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/boliviasleftturn1094549455
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBolivia's "left turn" toward rentier plurinationalism and its effects on ethnic tensions and solidarityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorplurinationalismen_US
dc.subject.authorindigeneityen_US
dc.subject.authorethnicityen_US
dc.subject.authornationalismen_US
dc.subject.authoridentityen_US
dc.subject.authorrentieren_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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